Web Only Articles

  • The Justice Gap

    If you care about equity, legal aid belongs high on the list of crucial disaster recovery programs.

  • NYC coastline.

    Rising Tides, Rising Costs

    In the face of climate change, flood insurance rates are rising. But program rules, and the history of who has been shunted into the floodplains, means the brunt is being bore by those least able to absorb it.

  • Detours on the Road Home

    Serious flaws in the Road Home program have kept many hard-working homeowners from coming back to the Lower Ninth Ward. Let’s not repeat them after the next disaster.

  • The Revitalization Trap

    Place-based initiatives won’t address the kinds of injustice and poverty that community development was formed to fight.

  • Eva and her son Joshua have been involved with WDP for over three years. Eva has testified at city hall and the state legislature in favor of better protections for construction workers.

    Protecting Immigrant Workers

    The Texas construction industry is a good example of what happens when immigrant workers’ rights are not respected. But this organization is fighting back.

  • A New Remedy for America’s Complicated Immigration History

    Public and private will—not politics—will change the national immigration conversation

  • Interview with John Henneberger, Texas Low Income Housing Information Service

    It’s not every year (or even every decade) that community developers and housers see themselves represented in the ranks of the coveted MacArthur Fellows (or “genius grant” recipients). That in and of itself would be sufficiently exciting, but when Shelterforce staff sat down to talk to John Henneberger of the Texas Low Income Housing Information Service, one of the 2014 MacArthur geniuses, we certainly found ourselves impressed and excited. Driven by a sense of justice since college, he has been on the frontlines of the fight for equality and equity since those years. Henneberger has extensive knowledge of the field, an ability to clearly relate many of our most basic concerns to each other, and a clear-eyed focus on end goals above interim measures. In this two part interview, he talks about expansive definitions of “fair housing,” exciting organizing work in Texas that the rest of the country should keep an eye on, the role of a state-level advocacy organization, and much more.

  • Interview with Mayor Ivy Taylor, San Antonio, TX

    When Julian Castro, then-mayor of San Antonio, Texas, was picked to be the new Secretary of the Dept. of Housing and Urban Development last year, the city council voted in Ivy Taylor from among their ranks to replace him. The first African-American mayor of the largely Latino and Anglo city, and strongly identified as an urban planner, Taylor casts herself as someone interested more in getting work done than leaving a political legacy. However, she has not shied away from controversial positions, and her initial position that she would not be running for re-election fell by the wayside as she announced her candidacy on February 16, less than two weeks after this interview. We spoke with Mayor Taylor, who has a background in affordable housing, about what it’s like to move between the community development sphere and city government, some of her difficult decisions, and her vision for stable, mixed-income neighborhoods in the city she is serving.

  • This Book Changes Everything

    Book Review: This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein

  • Review: More Than Shelter: Activism and Community in San Francisco Public Housing by Amy L. Howard

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