Web Only Articles

  • Review: More Than Shelter: Activism and Community in San Francisco Public Housing by Amy L. Howard

  • Interview: Jay Williams

    Jay Williams was the mayor of Youngstown, Ohio, from 2006 to 2011, at a time when Youngstown was attracting notoriety for making the unusual assertion that, rather than longing for its bygone glory days before the steel mills closed, it was going to embrace a vision of becoming a smaller, yet more vibrant city. (See Shelterforce’s “Small Is Beautiful, Again”, for more on this approach and how it affects low-income residents.) Williams is now assistant secretary of commerce for economic development, and administrator of the Economic Development Administration. Prior to joining the U.S. Department of Commerce, Williams served as the executive director of the Office of Recovery for Auto Communities and Workers, and he also served in the White House as deputy director for the White House Office of Intergovernmental Affairs. In this position, he led efforts to engage mayors, city council members, and county officials around the country.

    Shelterforce spoke with Williams at the conference of the National Alliance of Economic Development Associations last fall in San Antonio.

  • Interview: Wayne Meyer, President, New Jersey Community Capital

    New Jersey Community Capital shakes up our ideas of how nonprofit housers can and should approach neighborhood stabilization

  • Interview: George McCarthy, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy

    After 14 years at the Ford Foundation, most recently as the director of the Metropolitan Opportunities Unit, George "Mac" McCarthy became the fifth president of the 41-year-old Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, trading in his long daily commute to New York City and returning to Boston, where he grew up. McCarthy brings to the job that critical and nuanced eye for detail that comes with being an accomplished housing economist with the mission of bringing social justice to those denied it around the world. Well-known for his blunt and honest views and his ability to challenge as well as inspire those he works with, McCarthy has long seen land use policy as a means to reach the equity goals he's worked for in his roles as a teacher, researcher, and funder.

  • Sprawl vs. Unions

    The three very different stories of the building trades in Atlanta, Denver, and Portland, Ore., show just how much urban development patterns affect workers.

  • Rubbie McCoy (rt), a ProsperUs student, and her twin sister, featuring McCoy's balloon art at ProsperUs's 2014 annual convening.

    Out from Under the Table

    An enterpreneurial training program in Detroit has an unexpected side benefit—legitimizing existing but unofficial businesses, and poising them for growth.

  • Interview: Senator Mel Martinez and Mayor Henry Cisneros

  • INTERVIEW: Tony Pickett, Denver’s Urban Land Conservancy

    Probably no one in the country is in a better position than Tony Pickett to talk about efforts to include long-term affordable housing in two of the nation’s largest Transit Oriented Development (TOD) ventures: Denver’s FasTracks plan, and Atlanta’s Beltline project.

  • Phillip Henderson, President, Surdna Foundation

    Phillip Henderson was only 38 when he took the helm at the Surdna Foundation seven years ago, becoming Surdna’s second director in what he calls its “modern era.” Henderson came to the family foundation from a career that had been focused on international philanthropy, but he applied many of the lessons he learned fostering civic engagement in post-Communist Europe to Surdna’s domestic grantmaking. Henderson sat down with Shelterforce to talk about aligning program with mission, cross-pollination between programs, and Surdna’s recent launch into the impact investing world.

  • Urban Art or Graffiti Vandalism?

    Review of Stations of the Elevated, by Manfred Kirchheimer, 1981.

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