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  • The Challenges of Economic Integration

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    Addressing Social Segregation in Mixed-Income Communities

    Living next to each other does not necessarily mean getting to know each other.

  • Parents, students and guests gather  for Charleston Charter School for Math and Science opening ceremonies in 2008.

    Charter Schools, Gentrification, and Weighted Lotteries

  • Schools that Support Students’ Whole Lives

    Community schools support kids, families, and neighborhoods in their mission to improve education.

  • Gentrification and Public Schools: It’s Complicated

    An influx of more affluent families and their resources and advocacy is just what every struggling school needs, right? Well . . .

  • Don’t Call it a Comeback for Neighborhood Schools

    In the face of widespread school choice, some D.C. residents are advocating for an equitable system of neighborhood schools. But what's the chance that will become a reality?

  • Shelterforce Exclusive: Interview with HUD Secretary Julián Castro

    Last week, on the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Johnson’s signing of the bill that created HUD, Julián Castro, the agency’s 16th secretary, spoke at the University of Texas. In his speech he noted how the agency was formed partially in response to the Watts Rebellion in Los Angeles a month prior, situating the agency’s mission firmly in a social justice context, and he praised President Johnson as someone who believed in the potential for government to be a force for good. On September 3rd, Shelterforce got a chance to speak with Secretary Castro about some of the current ways in which he’s working to make HUD a force for good in people’s lives, and what steps there are left to be taken.

  • A New Remedy for America’s Complicated Immigration History

    Public and private will—not politics—will change the national immigration conversation

  • Interview with Mayor Ivy Taylor, San Antonio, TX

    When Julian Castro, then-mayor of San Antonio, Texas, was picked to be the new Secretary of the Dept. of Housing and Urban Development last year, the city council voted in Ivy Taylor from among their ranks to replace him. The first African-American mayor of the largely Latino and Anglo city, and strongly identified as an urban planner, Taylor casts herself as someone interested more in getting work done than leaving a political legacy. However, she has not shied away from controversial positions, and her initial position that she would not be running for re-election fell by the wayside as she announced her candidacy on February 16, less than two weeks after this interview. We spoke with Mayor Taylor, who has a background in affordable housing, about what it’s like to move between the community development sphere and city government, some of her difficult decisions, and her vision for stable, mixed-income neighborhoods in the city she is serving.

  • This Book Changes Everything

    Book Review: This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein

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