Web Only Articles

  • Progressive hip-hop artist Christylez Bacon performs at the Anacostia Arts Center.

    The Catalyzing Power of Art

    Art can be an economic engine for neighborhoods—but sometimes locally-based artists need some support to kick their “businesses” into gear, and community-based organizations are stepping up.

  • Interview with Rip Rapson, President and CEO of the Kresge Foundation

    Rip Rapson is the quintessential mid-westerner: quiet, modest, the last person in the world to toot his own horn. But if you look at what he’s accomplished and the insight he brings to his current work, you’ll get a much better picture of who he is and the challenging, important work he spearheads at the Kresge Foundation.

    A few weeks ago, we had the opportunity to speak with him, trace his experiences and the projects he conceived or championed over the years (some of which we’ve written about, but, not surprisingly, without his name attached to them) and drill into the opportunities and difficulties faced by a large philanthropic organization as it works to integrate its grant making interests with the way real communities operate—as dynamic entities with systems that fully integrate, even if they do so in a seriously dysfunctional way.

    One interest Kresge has is in arts and culture, and we spent some extra time talking with him about the importance and role of arts and culture in community health and development.

  • Pablo Nervaez speaks to fast-food workers, labor unions, and members of the community about the Opportunity to Work Initiative at City Hall in San Jose earlier this year.

    Fight for Full Time

    Unpredictable hours leads to unpredictable cash flow, which is a barrier to budgeting and saving. One response to this—the Opportunity to Work Initiative—would require San Jose employers to give more hours to part-time employees before hiring new staff.

  • Exclusive: Interview, Chester Hartman, Poverty & Race Research Action Council

    Chester Hartman was the first executive director of the Poverty & Race Research Action Council, and has been a leader in housing equity work for decades. His keen intellect and deep convictions, coupled with his writing, advocacy, scholarship, and leadership, have had a major effect on the field. Shelterforce is honored to have worked with him for many years as a member of our editorial board. His contributions to fair housing are extensive, and we’re sure those contributions will continue into his retirement. Right after his retirement from PRRAC as its director of research, Shelterforce had the opportunity to chat with him about his life, work, retirement, and hopes for the future.

  • Why We Must Build

    We can’t build our way out of the housing crisis . . . but we won’t get out without building.

  • Payday loan store window graphics.

    New Jersey Divests from Payday Lending

    Advocates in New Jersey mobilize to make a state pension fund put its money where its state regulations are.

  • Interview: Gordon Chin, Founding Executive Director of the Chinatown Community Development Center

    Gordon Chin started San Francisco Chinatown Community Development Center (CCDC), a longstanding CDC well-known in the field, in the mid-1970s. In June 2015, he released Building Community, Chinatown Style, a book about his professional life, the founding and evolution of CCDC, and the future of community development. Josh Ishimatsu, director of Research and Capacity Building at the National Coalition for Asian-Pacific American Community Development, and a regular Shelterforce contributor, spoke with Chin about where community development is going, and where it should go.

  • A New Remedy for America’s Complicated Immigration History

    Public and private will—not politics—will change the national immigration conversation

  • Interview with Mayor Ivy Taylor, San Antonio, TX

    When Julian Castro, then-mayor of San Antonio, Texas, was picked to be the new Secretary of the Dept. of Housing and Urban Development last year, the city council voted in Ivy Taylor from among their ranks to replace him. The first African-American mayor of the largely Latino and Anglo city, and strongly identified as an urban planner, Taylor casts herself as someone interested more in getting work done than leaving a political legacy. However, she has not shied away from controversial positions, and her initial position that she would not be running for re-election fell by the wayside as she announced her candidacy on February 16, less than two weeks after this interview. We spoke with Mayor Taylor, who has a background in affordable housing, about what it’s like to move between the community development sphere and city government, some of her difficult decisions, and her vision for stable, mixed-income neighborhoods in the city she is serving.

  • This Book Changes Everything

    Book Review: This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate by Naomi Klein

  • Page 1 of 6 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »