Subject: Organizing

  • ONE DC organizer Nkechi Feaster hands out applications for the training program.

    An Organizer’s Work Is Never Done

    An unprecedented local hiring win is a stepping stone in a trajectory to turn workforce development on its head.  · 

  • The Next Move is Always Ours

    Gale Force: Gale Cincotta: The Battles for Disclosure and Community Reinvestment, by Michael Westgate with Ann Vick-Westgate, Education and Resources Group, 2011, 416 pp. $20.00 (paper). Available on Amazon.  · 

  • An ACCE  action inside  of a Chase  Bank branch in Los Angeles

    The Unlikely Activists

    Wall Street’s criminal recklessness and its impact on millions of people across the country is making activists out of an unlikely selection of people.  · 

  • Taking the Measure of Community

    Contesting Community: The Limits and Potential of Local Organizing, by James DeFilippis, Robert Fisher, and Eric Shragge. Rutgers University Press, 2010, 208 pp. $25.95 (paper).  · 

  • Changing the Game

    London CITIZENS fights for permanently affordable housing in the shadow of the Olympics.  · 

  • The fiery rhetoric and confrontational tactics of Gale Cincotta, co-founder of National People's Action, helped lead to the passage of the Community Reinvestment Act in 1977.

    Has the Fight Gone Out of Organizing?

    After a brief, shining moment following the 2008 Republican National Convention, when it seemed community organizers would rule the country, they are now back on the defensive.  · 

  • The Fifth Avenue Committee, a neighborhood-based organization from Brooklyn, N.Y., participates in a citywide rally against rent increases for rent-stabilized apartments in October 2009.

    What Kind of Community Organizations and for What Purpose?

    We expect the "solutions" to social problems to be found within the community, and yet community groups, more often than not, work beyond their communities' boundaries. Why? Because they see the reality that if social and economic justice are to be realized in a community, then changes that are larger than the community must take place.  · 

  • ACORN Home Defenders mobilize to take back Tosha Alberty’s home, taken by the sheriffs and the bank. Oakland, CA.

    How Did the Media Fail ACORN and Organizing?

    Organizing has been under attack for years, but this time around, the media has been directly complicit in severely damaging one of most influential advocates for low- and moderate-income families in the country. How did the media miss the real story behind the assault on ACORN?  · 

  • ESOP's Jason Watson conducts casework with a homeowner.

    ESOP Rises Again

    The success of a Cleveland-based community organizing group in the face of massive foreclosures suggests that the city (and the nation) should have held on to a more diverse set of community organizations.  · 

  • Kathryn Tholin, CEO of the Center for Neighborhood Technology, poses with one of the group's I-Go Hybrid Electric Vehicles outside the center in Chicago. The Center for Neighborhood Technology is a Chicago nonprofit that researches and launches projects with economic and environmental benefits for urban areas. The center is among the eight winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation grants for nonprofit organizations.

    Equity 2.0:  The Missing Pieces

    Under President Obama, data transparency, private-sector innovation, and a renewed commitment to expanding opportunity could revolutionize housing and urban planning. But just as proponents of equity, open government data, and social entrepreneurship are being appointed to key positions, and while the administration is still young, the new HUD/DOT sustainable communities initiative illustrates why the devil is in the details.  · 

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